Sometimes you’ll run into a prospect who doesn’t have a set budget but wants you to tell them about your packages and pricing up front.

Then they get scared off if you tell them without understanding your value.

This can be a huge time waster for you so you must find a way to handle it effectively.

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You know when you’re at a networking event and everyone is asked to give their 30-second introduction?

And you know those people who get all windy and drone on for what feels like forever?

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You make your recommendation to your prospect and give him your price.

There’s a moment of silence a then a BIG GULP!

The question is… which one of you is doing the gulping?

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Sometimes, despite your best efforts, a prospect will tell you no.  Maybe their reasons are legitimate… or maybe they’re not.

So after you’ve done your best to turn their answer around, you exit respectfully and gracefully.

Now what?

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Until I moved to New York, it had been a good five years since I’d bought a jar of peanut butter.

But when I got here, I was too busy to shop and too busy to cook so I picked up a jar of peanut butter and the next think you know, I’m packing on the pounds!

The same thing can happen in your business.  It happens to me all the time…

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Is it possible that our prospects are like teenagers?

If I tell my 16-year old nephew not to drink and drive, will he really understand why not?  Maybe… but will he “buy” it?  Probably not.

The same goes with our prospects. If we spend our time telling them why they need to do something and go on to tell them why we’re the right resource, there’s no engagement… so it’s less effective.

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I was talking about sidewalk traffic with a native New Yorker the other day…because it can be a little crazy at times. People weave all over the sidewalk and it sometimes seems as if there’s absolutely no order AT ALL! What’s up with walking on the right and passing on the left?

Some people are looking at the sights, trying to navigate their way around or just searching out a place to eat….

Others are texting or talking and in their own little world.

What fascinated me is that my friend admitted he didn’t know, until he was 44 years old, that in most US cities people walk on the right side of the sidewalk. So in his case, he didn’t even know the “rules” for pedestrians.

So it makes me think of us, as entrepreneurs.  Some of us have our heads down, focused on on thing and totally missing out on what’s going on around us.

Others have our antennaes up… on the lookout for the new opportunities.

And others… who just don’t know “the rules”… but have made it this far… maybe inconveniencing others along the way at times… but not intending to do harm.

I’m not suggesting any one of those is good or bad… I just think they’re phases we cycle through at various stages of our business.

  • Keep your head down too long and you miss opportunities.
  • Keep looking at the tall buildings and miss what’s going on right in front of your face.
  • Break the rules and shake things up whether you’re aware of it or not.

I know that I always have a little of the “don’t know the rules” thing going on… which is good.  That’s how ‘treps blaze new trails for others.

I just got through the “tall building” phase with a lot of people approaching me about joint projects and trying to figure out how that fits into my own Biztruth activities… and now it’s time to spend more time “heads down” to focus, follow through and deliver.

What phase are you in in your business right now?

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Before moving to New York, I made regular trips to visit my sister here.

First, I was a tourist. Then progressed to being a visitor.  And now I’m a resident.

Check out how this relates to sales in your business…

On the first couple of trips, it was all about the sight seeing… the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, MOMA, eating out every meal…

I would whirl around, check it out and move onto the next tourist site.

After awhile, I felt less obliged to spend all of my time exploring the tourist sites and became, what I would consider, a “visitor”.

Between going to shows and museums, we started to poke around neighborhood street fairs, run errands and order takeout. I slowed down just a bit.

Now that I’m a resident, I’m connecting with other New Yorkers and making friends.

I’m working in my garden, walking to the grocery store and going for long bike rides.

Even though I have always lived life at a pretty fast pace… I’m being more conscious of building a relationship with my new neighborhood and actually slowing down to get to know the city better.

What does this have to do with sales, you ask?

Think about the sales conversations you have and identify which of those three would describe your prospect…

A tourist is a quick in & out, onto the next “site”.

In your biz, they’re the people who are currently on the sidelines and not quite ready to invest more than their time… so they take in all of the free content they can get.

Like watching this blog for tips and taking free teleclasses.

A visitor is still curious like a tourist, but slows down a bit to get to know a different side of things because she’s looking for growth and new experiences.

In business, these are people who are beginning to invest in themselves with low to mid-level programs that provide some direct interaction for short periods of time…like my SELL Event or Bootcamp.

A resident makes a higher investment in herself, because she’s made a longer-term commitment to really “move in” to her business and the programs that support her fully embracing that mindset.

In my business, these are the entrepreneurs who have more access to me on a more intimate, focused basis. Like my VIP clients or the folks in my invitation-only “Sales Confidence” mentorship progam.

So think about the sales conversations you’re having and identify which of those three would describe your prospect based on your different levels of programs.

And which of those three would describe YOU based on what sort of investments you’re making in your own biz?

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Last week I talked about the saying “confidence breeds success” and asked if it’s really “success that breeds confidence…which breeds more success”.

Today I’m coming at it from another angle and that is how “preparation breeds confidence…which breeds success”.

In my first business I had the good fortune of launching nearly 100 businesses which created a very comfortable income and lifestyle.

I was extremely confident in what I could do for my clients… which brought me success.

But I didn’t start out confident. In some areas, I felt overwhelmed and unclear and quite frankly, lost.

That success…and that confidence came from getting the help from a team of amazing coaches and mentors who helped me get my ducks in a row and ultimately build my confidence, one prospect at a time.

In short, it required a LOT of preparation.

  • What are you doing to build your success and ultimately, your confidence?
  • What steps do you take to prepare yourself for success?
  • Who’s in your line-up of mentors and coaches?
  • What are you doing to prove to yourself that you are taking your business seriously?

The measuring stick of success in business is sales.  If you don’t have sales, you don’t have clients.  If you don’t have clients, you’re not doing your “thing” and changing people’s lives for the better.

So start with the necessary sales preparation:

  • Define exactly who your ideal client is.
  • Get clear on how to articulate your value in your ideal prospect’s terms.
  • And establish a line of questioning that helps you guide your sales conversations so that you feel confident enough to make sales calls… so you enjoy success.

If you’re not sure where to start your preparation as it relates to sales, apply for a private sales confidence strategy session with me by going to: http://thebiztruth.com/strategy

Let’s explore what your biggest challenge is with sales and what you can do to have a confidence breakthrough.

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There’s a saying that confidence breeds success.

I actually wonder if it’s the other way around…that success breeds confidence (which breeds more success).

Let’s break it down.

Confidence is having belief in your abilities. Being sure of yourself.

Breed is to produce, cause or be the source of.

Success is the favorable outcome of something attempted. HINT:  In business, that’s called a sale.

So ‘confidence breeds success’ means:

Being sure that you can produce a favorable outcome of something you attempt.

That’s great…but what happens when you don’t have a favorable outcome but you thought you would?  Does that mean you’re not successful or that you were wrong to be confident?

I’ve been confident about my ability in things before but wasn’t successful at it.

What if we flip this around:

Success breeds confidence (which breeds more success).

That would sound like:

A favorable outcome of something you attempt is the source of belief in your  own abilities… which produces more favorable outcomes.

I’ll tell you from my own experience of when I started my first business 9 years ago that although I had confidence-building successes to build upon from my corporate career, TRUE confidence didn’t come until I had a consistent stream of successes in my new business…and then, because I was so confident in my abilities… that attracted even more clients and success.

I want to know what you think.  Post your comments on your perspective on whether confidence breeds success or does success breed confidence (which breeds more success)?

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