As a service-based entrepreneur, your business venture is very personal. You’re taking financial risks to strike out on your own and you want it to…

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You know when something is sitting right in front of you and you don’t see it?  Well, I had one of those V8 moments on New Year’s day while watching Gary V’s YouTube video about the “Thank You Economy”.

I realized that whenever I didn’t meet a goal last year – regardless of whether it was a stretch or minimum – I was so disappointed with myself – that I didn’t celebrate the entrepreneurs who DID attend my events and take my classes.

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Remember the Wendy’s commercials that ran in the mid- 80s with the three old ladies… and one asking “Where’s the beef?”

Besides being entertaining, here’s the brilliance of those commercials that you can apply to your sales conversations.

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What do you do when you’re having a sales conversation with a prospect who:

  1. you know isn’t your ideal client
  2. you know you’re not the right solution to help solve their problem

The answer is quite simple, but not always easy.

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Do you ever get on such a roll when you’re trying to make your point that you don’t even know what’s coming out of your mouth sometimes?

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As I reflect on what I love so much about being an entrepreneur, I realize that my reasons for choosing business ownership 10 years ago over a job…are the same reasons I have for staying self-employed.

That’s because it boils down to a few key values:  FUN, FREEDOM and FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITY.

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One thing can make or break your business. And I’m going to surprise you by saying, it’s not “sales.”

It’s what leads to sales:  It’s relationships.

I call it: Client Chemistry… which sums up the “Know, Like and Trust” factor.

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You make your recommendation to your prospect and give him your price.

There’s a moment of silence a then a BIG GULP!

The question is… which one of you is doing the gulping?

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Is it possible that our prospects are like teenagers?

If I tell my 16-year old nephew not to drink and drive, will he really understand why not?  Maybe… but will he “buy” it?  Probably not.

The same goes with our prospects. If we spend our time telling them why they need to do something and go on to tell them why we’re the right resource, there’s no engagement… so it’s less effective.

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Before moving to New York, I made regular trips to visit my sister here.

First, I was a tourist. Then progressed to being a visitor.  And now I’m a resident.

Check out how this relates to sales in your business…

On the first couple of trips, it was all about the sight seeing… the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, MOMA, eating out every meal…

I would whirl around, check it out and move onto the next tourist site.

After awhile, I felt less obliged to spend all of my time exploring the tourist sites and became, what I would consider, a “visitor”.

Between going to shows and museums, we started to poke around neighborhood street fairs, run errands and order takeout. I slowed down just a bit.

Now that I’m a resident, I’m connecting with other New Yorkers and making friends.

I’m working in my garden, walking to the grocery store and going for long bike rides.

Even though I have always lived life at a pretty fast pace… I’m being more conscious of building a relationship with my new neighborhood and actually slowing down to get to know the city better.

What does this have to do with sales, you ask?

Think about the sales conversations you have and identify which of those three would describe your prospect…

A tourist is a quick in & out, onto the next “site”.

In your biz, they’re the people who are currently on the sidelines and not quite ready to invest more than their time… so they take in all of the free content they can get.

Like watching this blog for tips and taking free teleclasses.

A visitor is still curious like a tourist, but slows down a bit to get to know a different side of things because she’s looking for growth and new experiences.

In business, these are people who are beginning to invest in themselves with low to mid-level programs that provide some direct interaction for short periods of time…like my SELL Event or Bootcamp.

A resident makes a higher investment in herself, because she’s made a longer-term commitment to really “move in” to her business and the programs that support her fully embracing that mindset.

In my business, these are the entrepreneurs who have more access to me on a more intimate, focused basis. Like my VIP clients or the folks in my invitation-only “Sales Confidence” mentorship progam.

So think about the sales conversations you’re having and identify which of those three would describe your prospect based on your different levels of programs.

And which of those three would describe YOU based on what sort of investments you’re making in your own biz?

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